brain cancer

-Regulus, Accelerate Brain Cancer Cure (ABC2) and Samsung Medical Center to Advance microRNA Therapeutics for Glioblastoma -

regulus therapeutics logoLA JOLLA, Calif., Dec. 12, 2011 /PRNewswire/ – Regulus Therapeutics Inc., a biopharmaceutical company leading the discovery and development of innovative medicines targeting microRNAs, today announced the initiation of a new discovery effort in microRNA therapeutics for the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most common and aggressive brain tumor in humans. Regulus will apply its expertise in microRNA therapeutics to discover chemically modified oligonucleotide anti-miRs for testing at the Samsung Medical Center in preclinical models that mimic human brain cancer. Accelerate Brain Cancer Cure (ABC2), a non-profit organization dedicated to accelerating therapies for brain cancer patients, has awarded Regulus a grant to support the research.

“GBM is a devastating disease with limited treatment options,” said Neil W. Gibson, Ph.D. Chief Scientific Officer of Regulus Therapeutics. “At Regulus, we have successfully targeted microRNAs in multiple disease settings and believe that targeting dysregulated microRNAs using [click to continue…]

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Patients suffering from an aggressive brain cancer will benefit from the results of a University of Illinois study that could advance the development of targeted gene therapies and improve prognosis.

“We have advanced the understanding of the role of microRNAs on glioblastoma multiforme, a deadly brain cancer, by studying the networks between the microRNAs and their target genes associated with different stages of cancer development and progression,” said Kristin Delfino, a U of I doctoral candidate in animal science with a focus in genetics and bioinformatics.

What exactly are microRNAs? microRNAs are small, non-coding RNA molecules that regulate the expression of genes such as oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes. U of I researchers used a novel approach to identify the simultaneous association between tens of thousands of microRNAs, target genes, and glioblastoma progression and survival.

Delfino integrated clinical information such as race, gender, therapy, survival, and cancer stage from 253 patients together with genome-wide microRNA and gene expression data.

“We looked at the big picture and how microRNAs work together,” Delfino said. “When you look at a single microRNA alone, it can seem significant. But when you evaluate it in the context of all other microRNAs, some [click to continue…]

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