extracellular

Time:

Wednesday, June 15, 2016
3pm-4pm CET / 2pm-3pm GMT / 9am-10am EST

Summary:

There are many different types of extracellular vesicles (EVs). Different subpopulations of exosomes, microvesicles and apoptotic bodies have been found to vary in size, composition and intracellular origin.

Within the last decade, cell-secreted EVs have been isolated from most of the fluids of the body, with many laboratories from around the world showing that their composition of lipids, proteins, messenger and micro RNAs are cell-type specific and subject to changes in pathological scenarios. As a result, EVs have been widely studied as a biological source to unravel low invasive biomarkers for predicting, diagnosing and monitoring diseases.
However, despite the many technological advances [click to continue…]

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Date: Tuesday Sept 30, 2014

LC SciencesIn the past, differential profiling and functional studies of microRNA (miRNA) has been performed mainly using tissues samples collected by invasive methods. However, in a clinical setting, more convenient and non-invasive methods are required, such as collection of peripheral blood or other bodily fluids. Recently, it has been demonstrated that miRNAs are present in circulating blood plasma, both free circulating and within exosomes, as well as within other biofluids such as cerebral spinal fluid, urine and even breast milk. These circulating miRNAs represent a potential new approach for diagnostic screening. [click to continue…]

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With two miRNA conferences coming up that focus on this field I thought the following manually curated database will be useful: miRandola.

Extracellular miRNAs in serum, plasma, saliva, urine and other body fluids have recently been shown to be associated with various pathological conditions including cancer. miRNAs circulate in the bloodstream in a highly stable, extracellular form, thus they may be used as blood-based biomarkers for cancer and other diseases. Circulating miRNAs are protected by encapsulation in membrane-bound vesicles such as exosomes, but the majority of circulating miRNAs in human plasma and serum cofractionate with Argonaute2 (Ago2) protein, rather than with vesicles. In the present work, the Ferro lab at the University of Catania performed a comprehensive classification of different extracellular circulating miRNA types. A direct link to the knowledge base miRò together with the inclusion of datamining facilities allow users to infer possible biological functions of the circulating miRNAs and their connection with the phenotype. To our knowledge miRandola is the first database that provides information about all kind of extracellular miRNAs and we believe that it will constitute a very important resource for researchers.

http://atlas.dmi.unict.it/mirandola/

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